Del Mar Photonics

Western Spectroscopy Association Conference
February 3rd - 5th, 2010, Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, CA
 

Meeting Schedule
All talks and poster sessions will be in the Chapel.
All meals will be served in Crocker Dining Hall.
Wednesday, February 3rd
3:30-6:00 p.m. Registration in Main Lodge
4:00-5:00 p.m. Set up for Poster Session I
5:00-6:00 p.m. Poster Session I
6:00-7:00 p.m. Dinner
7:45-9:00 p.m. Registration Continues in the Chapel
7:55-9:05 p.m. Session A Lectures & Welcoming Remarks in the Chapel
7:55-8:00 p.m. Tim Steimle (Arizona State University)
WSA Program Chair
8:00-8:45 p.m. Prof. Martin Zanni (Univ. of Wisconsin Madison, Chemistry)
揥e Need Help! Deficiencies in the Vibrational Coupling Models
of Peptides Used to Simulate 2D IR Spectra?br> 8:45-9:05 p.m. David Long (Cal Tech, Chemistry)
換uantitative Measurements of Magnetic Dipole and Electric
Quadrupole Transitions in the O2 A-band Using Frequencystabilized
Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy?br> 9:05-11:45 p.m. Poster Session I Continues
Thursday, February 4th
7:30 a.m. Breakfast
8:30-9:00 a.m. Registration in continues in the Chapel
9:00-10:30 a.m. Session B Lectures
Chair: C. Bradley Moore
9:00-9:45 a.m. Prof. Lucy Ziurys (Univ. of Arizona, Chemistry & Astronomy)
揗olecules Beyond the Solar System: New Insights into the
Spectroscopy of Transient Species?br> 9:45-10:30 a.m. Prof. Gerard Meijer (Fritz-Haber Institut der max-Planck-
Gesellschaft)
揟aming Molecular Beams; Towards a Molecular Laboratory on a
Chip?br> 10:30-10:50 a.m. Coffee Break
10:50-12:20 p.m. Session C Lectures
Chair: Trevor Sears
10:50-11:35 a.m. Prof. Benjamin Schwartz (UCLA, Chemistry)
揥atching the Solvation of Atoms in Liquids,
One Solvent Molecule at a Time?br> 11:35 -11:55 a.m. Paul Raston (Univ. of Alberta, Chemistry)
揗icrowave Spectroscopy of (para-H2)N-OCS and (para-H2)N-CO
Clusters?br> 11:55-12:15 p.m. Emily Fenn (Stanford University, Chemistry)
揥ater Dynamics at Neutral and Ionic Interfaces?br> 12:20-1:30 p.m. Lunch
Thursday, February 4th
1:30-3:20 p.m. Session D Lectures
Chair: Craig Taatjes
1:30-2:15p.m. Prof. R. W. Field (MIT, Chemistry)
揂cetylene: Just Large Enough?br> 2:15 -2:35 p.m. Dr. Oleg Kornilov (LBNL & UC-Berkeley)
揊emtosecond Photoionization Dynamics of Pure Helium
Droplets?br> 2:35-3:20 p.m. Prof. Alexander Benderskii (USC, Chemistry)
揌ydrogen Bonding, Vibrational, and Rotational Dynamics at
Aqueous Interfaces?br> 3:20-5:00 p.m. Break
5:30-6:00 p.m. Set up for Poster Session II
6:00-7:00 p.m. Banquet (Seascape)
7:30-8:30 p.m. Banquet Address in the Chapel:
Dr. John C. Pearson (JPL & Cal Tech)
揕aboratory Spectroscopy in the Era of Big Science Data Users?br> 8:30-11:45 p.m. Poster Session II Continues
Friday, February 5th
7:30 a.m. Breakfast
9:00-10:15 a.m. Session E Lectures
Chair: Anne Myers Kelley
9:00-9:20 a.m. Marie N. van Staveren (UC-Irvine, Chemistry)
揝olid-like Coherent Vibronic Dynamics in a Room Temperature
Liquid: Resonance Raman and Absorption Spectroscopy of Liquid
Bromide?br> 9:20-10:05a.m. Prof. Cheuk Y. Ng (UC-Davis, Chemistry)
揝pectroscopy and Dynamics of Neutrals and Ions by VUV and
UV Photoionization and Photodissociation Methods?br> 10:05-10:25 a.m. Yingdi Liu (UC-Riverside, Chemistry)
揗easurements of Peroxy Radicals Using Chemical
Amplification-Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy?br> 10:25-10:45 a.m. Break
Remember to check out by 12:00 noon!
10:45-11:50 am Session F Lectures
Chair: Fred Grieman
10:45-11:05 a.m. Mellissa Hill (UC-Davis, Chemistry)
揟riplet State Chemistry of Biologically Relevant Pyridoxal 5?
Phosphate Schiff Base as Determined by Transient Absorption
Spectroscopies?br> 11:05-11:50 a.m. Prof. Judy E. Kim (UC-San Diego, Chemistry)
揚hotochemistry, Photophysics, and Structures of Functional
Tryptophan Residues: Radical Intermediates and Protein Anchors?br> 11:50-12:00 a.m. Closing Remarks, Judy Kim, WSA Program Vice-Chair
12:00 p.m. Lunch
Poster Session I (Wednesday, February 3)
5-6PM, 9-11 PM
1) Kathryn A. Colby, Jonathan J. Burdett, Robert F. Frisbee, Lingyan Zhu, Robert J. Dillon, Kerry
M. Hanson, and Christopher J. Bardeen
Energy migration in dye-doped polymer films: Evidence for anomalous exciton diffusion
University of California, Riverside
2) Ryan M. Young, Graham B. Griffin, and Daniel M. Neumark
Electronic relaxation dynamics in acetonitrile cluster anions
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley
Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
3) W.A. Hale (1), N.C. Freyschlag (2), K.A. Martin (2), and A.M. Nishimura (1)
Evidence for Quenching of Methylnaphthalene Fluorescence by Cyclopentanone on Al2O3
(1) Department of Chemistry, Westmont College
(2) Department of Chemistry, Point Loma Nazarene University
4) Shanshan Yu (1), John C. Pearson (1), Brian J. Drouin (1), Olivier Pirali (2), Michel Vervloet
(2), Marie-Aline Martin (2), and Christian P. Endres (3)
Terahertz and far-infrared spectroscopy of high-J transitions of ammonia
(1) Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology
(2) Synchrotron SOLEIL, L'Orme des Merisiers Saint-Aubin, France
(3) I. Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Germany
5) Cesar S. Contreras, Claire L. Ricketts, and Farid Salama
Laboratory Studies of the Formation Processes of Interstellar PAHs
NASA Ames Research Center, Space Science Division, and Oak Ridge Associated Universities
6) Amy Cordones, Teresa Bixby, and Steve Leone
Power and Wavelength Dependent Studies of Fluorescence Blinking in Single CdSe/ZnS
Nanoparticles
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley
Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
7) David S. Medina, Yingdi Liu, and Jingsong Zhang
Detection of Nitrate Radical Using Cavity Enhanced Absorption and Off-Axis Cavity Ringdown
Spectroscopy
University of California, Riverside
8) Xinchuan Huang, David W. Schwenke, and Timothy J. Lee
Spectroscopically Accurate Potential Energy Surface and Rovibrational Energy Levels of 14NH3
and 15NH3
SETI Institute; NASA Ames Research Center
9) Darcy H. Tarrant (1), Peter B. Kelly (2), and Gary W. Scott (1)
The Excited States of Dianthracenes
(1) Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside
(2) Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis
10) Molly A. Taylor, Jordan M. Pio, Wytze E. van der Veer, and Kenneth C. Janda
Competition Between Electronic and Vibrational Predissociation Dynamics of the HeBr2 and
NeBr2 van der Waals Molecules
University of California, Irvine
11) Adam L. Sturlaugson (1), Kendall S. Fruchey (1), Stephen R. Lynch (1), Sergio R. Arag (2),
and Michael D. Fayer (1)
Orientational and Translational Dynamics of Polyether/Water Solutions
(1) Stanford University
(2) San Francisco State University
12) Zsolt Gengeliczki, Daniel E. Rosenfeld, and Michael D. Fayer
Orientational motion of molecules at interfaces
Stanford University
13) Hana Cho, Nils Huse, Tae-Kyu Kim, and Robert W. Schoenlein
Ultrafast Dynamics of Photoinduced Iron(II) Spin Crossover Reaction in Solution by Time-
Resolved Soft X-ray Spectroscopy
Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Department of Chemistry, Pusan National University, Geumjeong-gu Busan, Korea
14) John B. Randazzo (1), Philip Croteau (1), Oleg Kostko (2), Musahid Ahmed (2), and Kristie A.
Boering (3)
Measurement of the photoionization of 14N2, 15N2, and 14N15N between 15.5 and 18.9 eV using
synchrotron radiation
(1) Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley
(2) Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory;
(3) Departments of Chemistry and Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California,
Berkeley
15) O. Kornilov, O. Gessner, C. Wang, O. Buenermann, S. Leone, and D. Neumark
Femtosecond photoionization dynamics of pure helium droplets
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley
16) Xianfeng Zheng, Yu Song, Jingze Wu, and Jingsong Zhang
H-atom product channel and mode specificity in the near-UV photodissociation of thiomethoxy
radical via the A2A1 state
Department of Chemistry and Air Pollution Research Center, University of California
17) Edward T. Branigan, Marie N. van Staveren, V. Ara Apkarian
Solid-like coherent vibronic dynamics in a room temperature liquid: Resonant Raman and
absorption spectroscopy of liquid bromine
University of California, Irvine
18) Amelia W. Ray (1), David L. Osborn (2), Craig A. Taatjes (2), Giovanni Meloni (1)
Vinyl Alcohol: A Major Product of the Ethene + OH Reaction
(1) Department of Chemistry, University of San Francisco
(2) Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories
19) F. Goulay (1), L. Nemes (2), P. E. Schrader (1), and H. A. Michelsen (1)
Spectrally Resolved Laser-Induced Incandescence of Soot Particles
(1) Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories
(2) Chemical Research Centre of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary
20) Anh Le and T. C. Steimle
Spectroscopy in support of parity non-conservation measurements: 87SrF and 137BaF
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University
21) Fang Wang and T. C. Steimle
Molecular beam Stark spectroscopy of CuF and CuOH
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University
22) Maria A. Garcia, Michael D. Morse
Resonant two photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy of jet-cooled osmium nitride
University of Utah, Department of Chemistry
23) Fangyuan Han, Jie Zhang, and Wei Kong
Polarization Spectroscopy of Tetracene Embedded in He Droplets and Aligned by a Laser Field
Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University
24) Jeffrey J. Kay, Kevin E. Strecker, and David W. Chandler
Production of cold atoms by collisional cooling
Sandia National Laboratories
25) Hiroaki Maekawa (1), Matteo De Poli (2), Alessandro Moretto (2), Claudio Toniolo (2), and
Nien-Hui Ge (1)
Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy Reveals Amide-I/II Couplings between Hydrogen-
Bonded Peptide Linkages in a 3(10)-Helix
(1) Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine
(2) Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, CNR, Padova Unit, Department of Chemistry,
University of Padova, Italy
26) W. Atom Yee (1), James W. Lewis (2), and Yaopeng Zhao (3)
Low Temperature Photochemistry of 1,4-Diphenylbutadiene
(1) Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Santa Clara University
(2) Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Cruz
(3) Department of Chemistry, University of Miami
Poster Session II (Thursday, February 4)
5:15-6:30 PM, 9-11 PM
1) Hiroaki Maekawa (1), Matteo De Poli (2), Alessandro Moretto (2), Claudio Toniolo (2), and
Nien-Hui Ge (1)
Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy Reveals Amide-I/II Couplings between Hydrogen-
Bonded Peptide Linkages in a 3(10)-Helix
(1) Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine
(2) Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, CNR, Padova Unit, Department of Chemistry,
University of Padova, Italy
2) Kilyoung Kim and Eric T. Sevy
The study of State-specific Energy Gain by N2O during Collisions with Vibrationally Excited
Pyrazine
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University
3) C. McRaven, M. Cich, G. V. Lopez, and T. J. Sears
Near infrared spectroscopy referenced to a frequency comb
University of Oklahoma
Stony Brook University
Brookhaven National Laboratory
4) R. J. Gates, C. Sheffield, M. C. Asplund
Comparison of DFT measured properties of weak agostic metal complexes
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University
5) O. Krechkivska, Michael D. Morse
Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of 5d carbides
University of Utah, Department of Chemistry
6) E. Vehmanen, J. Eloranta, and V.A. Apkarian
LIF spectroscopy of Cu2-He
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine
7) Ming Sun (1), Dennis J. Clouthier (2), and Lucy M. Ziurys (1)
Fourier Transform Microwave spectrum of the AlCCH radical and its 13C/D isotopologues
(1) Departments of Chemistry and Astronomy, Arizona Radio Observatory and Steward
Observatory, University of Arizona
(2) Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky
8) Shanshan Yu (1), John C. Pearson (1), Brian J. Drouin (1), Adam Walters (2), Holger S. P.
Müller (3), and Sandra Brünken (3)
Terahertz spectroscopy of excited water
(1) Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology
(2) Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, Toulouse University, France
(3) I. Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Germany
9) Jie Zhang, Fanyuan Han, and Wei Kong
ZEKE spectroscopy of PAHs
Oregon State University
10) Lisa Marshall, Jian Cui, Xavier Brokmann, and Moungi Bawendi
Interferometric FCS for measuring spectral dynamics of single particles in solution
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
11) James E. Patterson, Alexander D. Curtis, and Arthur D. Quast
In Situ Spectroscopy of Model Liquid Chromatography Stationary Phases
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University
12) Lindsay N. Zack, Brent J. Harris, and Lucy M. Ziurys
Studies in 3d Hydroxides: The Pure Rotational Spectrum of ZnOH (X2A')
Departments of Chemistry and Astronomy, Arizona Radio Observatory and Steward
Observatory, University of Arizona
13) Casey Davis-Van Atta, Kira Watson, Fred Grieman, Aaron Noell, Stanley Sander, and Mitchio
Okumura
Study of the HO2/Acetone Reaction Approaching Tropospheric Temperatures Using Infrared
Kinetic Spectroscopy (IRKS)
Pomona College and Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology
14) Xiujuan Zhuang and T. C. Steimle
The visible spectrum of gas-phase titanium dioxide
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University
15) Daniel R. B. Sluss, Paul H. Davis, Becky L. Munoz, Larry F. Scatena, and Michael W. Hill
A Molecular Level View of Chem/Bio Protective Materials: Vibrational Sum Frequency
Generation Spectroscopy of Polymer Surfaces & Chemical Weapons Simulants
Boise Technology, Inc.
16) Craig Bieler, Culver Redd, and Andrew Fidler
The Ultraviolet/Visible Absorption Spectra of Benzoic Acid Derivatives
Albion College
17) Fariba Allyasin, Sarah McGovern, and Alfred Leung
Low-cost Frequency-domain Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements
California State University, Long Beach
18) C.L. Binkley (1), N.C. Freyschlag (2), M.L. Gross (1), W.A. Hale (1), T.C. Judkins (1), K.A.
Martin (2), and A.M. Nishimura (1)
Disubstitutional Effect on Naphthalene Fluorophores on Al2O3
(1) Department of Chemistry, Westmont College
(2) Department of Chemistry, Point Loma Nazarene University
19) Dharmalingam Kurunthu, Yaobing Wang, Gary W. Scott, and Christopher J. Bardeen
Fluorescence Quenching in Conjugated Polymers/Reduced Graphitic Oxide blends
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside
20) T. Pfeifer, M. J. Abel, P. Nagel, W. Boutu, M. J. Bell, H. Mashiko, C. P. Steiner, A. R. Beck, D.
M. Neumark, and S. R. Leone
Molecular Attosecond Dynamics
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley
Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
21) Qian He (1), David L. Osborn (2), Craig A. Taatjes (2), and Giovanni Meloni (1)
OH Initiated Oxidation of Gamma Valerolactone
(1) Department of Chemistry, University of San Francisco
(2) Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories
22) Kendall Fruchey and Michael D. Fayer
Rotational Dynamics in Ionic Liquids
Stanford University
23) Jordan M. Pio, Molly A. Taylor, Wytze E. van der Veer, Craig R. Bieler, and Kenneth C. Janda
Real-time dissociation dynamics of the Ne2Br2 van der Waals complex
University of California, Irvine
24) Beth E. Reed, Luis A. Cuadra-Rodriguez, and G. Barney Ellison
A Water Droplet Spectrometer
University of Colorado, Boulder
25) Marina Stavytska‐Barba and Anne Myers Kelley
Surface enhanced Raman study of the interaction of PEDOT:PSS with silver and gold
nanoparticles
University of California, Merced
26) Haifeng Huang, Daniel J. Merthe, Judit Zádor, Leonard E. Jusinski, and Craig A. Taatjes
New experiments and validated master-equation modeling for OH production in propyl/ethyl +
O2 reactions
Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories
We Need Help! Deficiencies in the Vibrational Coupling Models of Peptides
Used to Simulate 2D IR Spectra.
Martin T. Zanni
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy is proving to be a very useful tool in structural
biology because it has a combination of structure- and time-resolution that is unique among
standard structural tools. While 2D IR spectroscopy is providing new insights protein structural
kinetics, the accuracy that structural information can be obtained from 2D IR spectra is limited
by our understanding of the vibrational coupling in proteins. To extract structural information
from 2D IR spectra, or to test structures against 2D IR spectra, a coupling model must be used to
relate the measured frequencies and anharmonicities to the protein structure and its environment.
Existing models are largely based on ab initio calculations with little or no experimental
verification. They are difficult to test against solution-phase peptide structures because small
model peptides amenable to ab initio calculations do not have well-defined structures in solution
(or multiple structures). Furthermore, their infrared spectra are too broad to distinguish between
frequency shifts caused by differences in peptide structures versus those caused by solvation
effects. What is needed are infrared spectra of peptides with known conformations and
controllable solvation states. We believe that gas-phase studies of small peptides could provide
an important data set from which to test existing coupling models and develop new ones.
This talk will provide an overview of the experimental methods used to obtain 2D IR
spectra and the coupling models that are being used to convert between protein structures and
infrared spectra. Experiments currently underway in our laboratory will be presented for which
the accuracy of the structural models have a direct impact. We aim to stimulate a discussion on
future experiments that could be used to improve existing peptide coupling models.
Quantitative Measurements of Magnetic Dipole and Electric Quadrupole
Transitions in the O2 A-band Using Frequency-Stabilized Cavity Ring-Down
Spectroscopy
D.A. Long,1 D.K. Havey,2 M.Okumura,1 H.M. Pickett,3 C.E. Miller,3 and J.T. Hodges2
1Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering,
California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125
2Process Measurements Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology,
100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899
3Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology,
4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109
Frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy (FS-CRDS) was employed to make
quantitative, laboratory-based measurements of magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole
transitions in the O2 A-band (b1Σg
+←X3Σg
-(0,0)). The A-band is triply forbidden by quantum
mechanical selection rules, but allowed as a magnetic dipole or electric quadrupole transition.
Despite this inherent weakness, the A-band is the most prominent, near-infrared absorbance in
the atmosphere and has been extensively utilized in remote sensing measurements to determine
optical pathlengths and optical properties of clouds and aerosols.
FS-CRDS differs from traditional single mode, cw-CRDS by actively stabilizing the
optical cavity length through the use of a co-resonant reference beam (1). This length
stabilization leads to an extremely linear and stable spectral frequency axis. This allows
transition frequencies and pressure shifting coefficients to be measured at the sub-MHz (<3×10-5
cm-1) and 0.5% levels, respectively. In addition, FS-CRDS possesses the high sensitivity inherent
to all cavity enhanced techniques, with low loss mirrors enabling a short term noise equivalent
absorption coefficient of 2.5×10-10 cm-1 Hz-1/2. Long-term averaging is also possible, due to the
stable frequency axis, allowing for a detection limit of 2.5×10-31 cm molec.-1.
Through the use of this long-term averaging we have been able to quantitatively measure
(uncertainties in the line intensity measurements of less than 9%) nine ultraweak electric
quadrupole transitions having intensities of 3×10-30 to 2×10-29 cm molec.-1 (2). Seven of these
transitions had not previously been observed.
Magnetic dipole transitions have also been extensively measured with FS-CRDS. Line
intensities and lineshape parameters have been reported with uncertainties at the 0.1% and 1%
level, respectively (3). Room-temperature measurements have been of transitions up to J?50,
corresponding to line strengths at the 1×10-30 cm molec.-1 level. These measurements have
allowed us to examine the validity of present spectroscopic databases at high rotational energy.
Recent measurements have shown evidence of a subtle Herman-Wallis rotational-vibrational
interaction.
References:
(1) J.T. Hodges, et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75 (2004) 849.
(2) D.A. Long, et al., Phys. Rev. A 80 (2009) 042513.
(3) D.J. Robichaud, et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 248 (2008) 1.
Molecules Beyond the Solar System: New Insights into the Spectroscopy of
Transient Species
L.M. Ziurys
University of Arizona
At present, over 140 different chemical compounds have been detected in interstellar
space, primarily via their pure rotational spectra, measured with radio telescopes. Over half of
these molecules are free radicals, molecular ions, or metastable isomers, namely, species that are
transient under terrestrial conditions. High resolution laboratory molecular spectroscopy has
played a critical role in the discovery and study of interstellar molecules, by providing the
necessary 揻ingerprints?for identification in astronomical data. Therefore, the compounds that
are discovered in space are highly correlated with those than can be measured in the laboratory,
and the success of synthetic techniques in creating unusual species. The sensitivity, stability and
spectral coverage of heterodyne receivers at radio telescopes are naturally other critical factors.
With the technological advances fostered by the development of the upcoming Atacama Large
Millimeter Array, or ALMA, improvements in receivers at radio telescopes have been
substantial. New interstellar molecular compounds are being discovered that suggest ever
increasing complexity in interstellar synthesis. Some of these recent identifications include
phosphorus-bearing species, such as PO, CCP, and HCP. For many years, few phosphoruscontaining
species were known in interstellar gas. Possible 損re-biotic?organic molecules are
also being found, such as glycolaldehyde and acetamide. There are interesting chemical trends
concerning the types of organic molecules that are present, or absent, in interstellar space.
Unexpected metastable isomers, such as HSCN, are also being identified in the interstellar
medium, as well as unusual inorganic compounds like AlO. Some of these recent molecular
detections will be discussed, as well as the laboratory spectroscopic work that made them
possible. As these studies and others show, it has become increasingly apparent that chemical
synthesis occurs even under some of the most extreme interstellar conditions. Furthermore, it is
now well-recognized that solar systems form out of molecular material, linking our origins to
interstellar chemistry. In fact, we have only begun to evaluate the molecular content outside our
solar system. The impact of the emerging field of astrochemistry for molecular spectroscopy will
be discussed, and future directions suggested for the laboratory study of 搉on-terrestrial?br> molecules.
References:
揇etection of the CCP Radical (X 2Πr) in IRC+10216: A New Interstellar Phosphorus-
Containing Species,?D.T. Halfen, D.J. Clouthier, and L. M. Ziurys, Ap.J.(Letters), 677, L101
(2008)
揗illimeter Detection of AlO (X2Σ+): Metal Oxide Chemistry in the Envelope of VY Canis
Majoris,?E .D. Tenenbaum and L. M. Ziurys, Ap.J.(Letters), 694, L59 (2009)
揇etection of a New Interstellar Molecule: Thiocyanic Acid HSCN, ?D. T. Halfen, L. M.
Ziurys, S. Brünken, M. C. McCarthy, C. A. Gottlieb, and P. Thaddeus, Ap.J.(Letters), 702,
L124 (2009)
Taming Molecular Beams; Towards a Molecular Laboratory on a Chip
Gerard Meijer
Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin, Germany
e-mail: meijer@fhi-berlin.mpg.de
Getting ever better control over gas-phase molecules is an important research theme and
drives progress in the field of molecular physics. The motion of neutral molecules in a beam can
be manipulated with inhomogeneous electric and magnetic fields. Static fields can be used to
deflect or focus molecules, whereas time-varying fields can be used to decelerate or accelerate
beams of molecules to any desired velocity. I will give an overview of the possibilities that this
molecular beam technology presently offers, ranging from ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy and
novel scattering experiments to lifetime measurements on trapped molecules [1].
I will report in particular on our recent experiments demonstrating trapping of carbon
monoxide molecules on a chip [2] using direct loading from a supersonic beam [3,4]. Upon
arrival above the chip, the molecules are confined in tubular electric field traps of about 20
micrometer diameter, centered 25 micrometer above the chip, that move along with the
molecular beam at a velocity of several hundred meters per second. By using the 13CO
isotopologue, losses due to nonadiabatic transitions [5] near the center of the tubular traps are
prevented. An array of these miniaturized moving traps can be brought to a complete standstill
over a distance of only a few centimeters. After a certain holding time, the molecules can be
accelerated off the chip again for detection. This loading and detection methodology is
applicable to a wide variety of polar molecules, and enables the creation of a molecular
laboratory on a chip. Many of the gas phase molecular physics experiments that are currently
being performed in large beam machines might be performed in a compact vacuum machine on a
surface area of a few square centimeters in the future and new experiments will become possible.
References:
[1] S.Y.T. van de Meerakker, H.L. Bethlem, and G. Meijer, Nature Physics 4, (2008) 595.
[2] S.A. Meek, H. Conrad, and G. Meijer, Science 324, (2009) 1699.
[3] S. A. Meek, H.L. Bethlem, H. Conrad, and G. Meijer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, (2008) 153003.
[4] S.A. Meek, H. Conrad, and G. Meijer, New J. Phys. 11, (2009) 055024.
[5] M. Kirste, B.G. Sartakov, M. Schnell, and G. Meijer, Phys. Rev. A 79, (2009) 051401(R).
Watching the Solvation of Atoms in Liquids, One Solvent Molecule at a Time
Ben Schwartz
University of California, Los Angeles
When chemical reactions take place in liquids, it is generally assumed that molecular
details of how the liquid interacts with reacting solutes don抰 matter: electron transfer and other
solvent-driven reactions are usually described by treating the liquid as a continuum. In this talk,
we present the results from a combination of quantum molecular dynamics simulations and
ultrafast spectroscopy aimed at studying the motions of solvent molecules around sodium atoms
in a room-temperature organic liquid. Our MD simulations reveal that the sodium solute's
electronic absorption spectrum correlates with the number of nearest solvent molecules that
interact with it. Our experiments explore this correlation by measuring the spectral dynamics
accompanying the fluctuations that change the number of coordinating solvent molecules at
equilibrium. We find that the rearrangement of the solvent molecules around the atoms occurs
discretely ?we are able to spectroscopically identify and temporally resolve the arrival of
individual solvent molecules in the first solvent shell around the atom. Moreover, our results
suggest that atoms coordinated by different numbers of solvent molecules behave as (albeit quite
transiently) chemically distinct species, so that a continuum description of the solvent would lead
to an entirely incorrect description of the molecular relaxation. Finally, we note that our results
also allow us to explain the breakdown of Linear Response for atomic solvation dynamics that
we observed previously [Science 321, 1817 (2008)].
Microwave Spectroscopy of (para-H2)N-OCS and (para-H2)N-CO Clusters
Paul Raston, Chrissy Knapp, and Wolfgang Jäger
Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2, Canada
Rotational spectra of both carbon monoxide (CO) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) solvated with
N≤10 para-hydrogen (pH2) molecules have been collected using pulsed nozzle Fourier transform
microwave spectroscopy. The clusters were generated in a supersonic expansion by forcing a
high pressure (up to 200 bar) mixture consisting of about 0.01% CO or OCS and 2-5% pH2 in
helium through a pinhole nozzle. The observed transitions were assigned to clusters with specific
N-values based on the dependence of the signal intensity on the sample composition and backing
pressure, and by comparison with infrared data.1,2 The end-over-end rotational frequency
(proportional to the inverse moment of inertia) decreases with increasing cluster size for (pH2)NOCS
as is expected classically. For (pH2)N-CO, the rotational frequency decreases to a minimum
at N=6, then increases in going to N=7; this could indicate a significant decoupling of pH2
density from CO rotation. By measuring the pure rotational frequencies of the (pH2)N-CO
clusters we are able to separate the rotational and vibrational contributions to the infrared line
positions.
References:
1 J. Tang, A. R. W. McKellar, J. Chem. Phys., 2004, 121, 3087
2 S. Moroni, M. Botti, S. De Palo, A. R. W. McKellar, J. Chem. Phys., 2005, 122, 094314
Water Dynamics at Neutral and Ionic Interfaces
Emily Fenn, Daryl Wong, and Michael D. Fayer
Department of Chemistry, Stanford University
The hydrogen bonding properties of water often deviate from their bulk behaviors in the
presence of an interface. Whether the interface is hydrophilic, hydrophobic, charged, or neutral,
it has the ability to disrupt the concerted reorientational motions of water molecules that are
necessary for hydrogen bond network rearrangement. Measuring how quickly the hydrogen
bond network randomizes affords information about how confined or hindered a system is. Such
considerations are important, for example, in fuel cell membranes which require efficient
pathways for proton transport. An important question is whether the chemical composition or
solely the presence of an interface plays the dominant role in affecting the hydrogen bonding
dynamics of interfacial water. To answer this question, ultrafast infrared pump-probe techniques
are used to measure water orientational relaxation dynamics at the water/head group interfaces of
two same-size reverse micelles systems made from either an ionic or neutral surfactant. The
ionic reverse micelles are made from bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT), and the nonionic
micelles are made from Igepal CO-520. AOT contains a sulfonate head group with a sodium
counterion while Igepal has a hydroxyl head group. In each micelle there is a large region of
mostly bulk-like water molecules, but there is also a significant fraction of water that hydrates
the surfactant head groups. Previous comparisons between water dynamics in AOT and Igepal
looked at the collective reorientations of water molecules; now we present a method that
separates the dynamics of interfacial water molecules from the bulk-like water interior. It is
found that the orientational relaxation dynamics for interfacial water molecules are similar in
magnitude for AOT and Igepal systems, with Igepal being slightly faster. These results suggest
that while the presence of the interface is the dominant factor in determining the dynamics, the
chemical composition may play a secondary role.
Acetylene: Just Large Enough
Robert W. Field
Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
What can acetylene (H-C C-H) do that a diatomic molecule cannot? It can undergo
bond-breaking isomerization. The minimum energy isomerization path from acetylene to
vinylidene is a very large-amplitude local-bend. How are large-amplitude motions encoded in a
spectrum? At high vibrational excitation, anharmonic interactions between vibrational normalmodes
become very strong and all of the textbook energy level patterns, upon which assignments
are based, are shattered. Most vibrational eigenstates are complex, one might even say
揺rgodic,?mixtures of many normal-mode basis-states. However, large-amplitude-motion states
comprise a tiny fraction of all eigenstates. How does one gain access to these rare largeamplitude
states? How does one distinguish a large-amplitude state from an ergodic state in a
spectrum? How does one use large-amplitude states to map the chemically interesting
isomerization path on the S0 potential energy surface? Access is provided by a 搇ocal-bender
pluck?state, which exploits anharmonic interactions on the S1 potential energy surface to escape
Franck-Condon restrictions in the S1 S0 Stimulated Emission Pumping (SEP) spectrum. A
relatively low trans-cis isomerization barrier on S1 provides spectroscopic access to eigenstates
proximal to a high barrier on S0. Electronic properties (such as the electric dipole transition
moment) serve as embedded reporters on the existence and extent of large-amplitude motions.
However, electronic properties give rise to minuscule level splittings. How does one combine a
survey over a wide spectral region in search of rare large-amplitude local-bender states yet
simultaneously achieve the extremely high resolution necessary to read what the embedded
reporter has written? Brooks Pate (University of Virginia) has developed 揅hirped Pulse
Microwave Spectroscopy (CPMW),?which combines the previously unimaginable combination
of survey (10GHz), high-resolution (100kHz), and accurate relative-intensity (1 part in 104)
capabilities. The CPMW scheme is perfectly suited to 20 Hz repetition rate pulsed supersonic jet
molecular beams and Q-switched Nd:YAG pumped pulsed tunable lasers, upon which most
small-molecule spectroscopists depend.
This research has been supported by the Department of Energy (Grant: DE-FG0287ER13671).
Femtosecond Photoionization Dynamics of Pure Helium Droplets
O. Kornilov, O. Gessner, C. Wang, O. Buenermann, S. Leone, and D. Neumark
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and UC Berkeley
Superfluid helium droplets possess properties, which make them targets of active
research in diverse fields of science: from nuclear physics to high-resolution molecular
spectroscopy. Apart from fundamentally important collective quantum effects the droplets show
ability to efficiently pick-up foreign atoms, molecules and complexes. The latter serves as a
basis for a number of matrix isolation spectroscopy techniques including rotational, vibration and
electronic excitation spectroscopy. Complementary to these studies in energy domain, novel
time-domain experiments will be presented emphasizing dynamics of photoionization of a pure
helium droplets via photoelectron spectroscopy. These experiments follow up on a
recentphotoelectron spectroscopy study in energy domain using synchrotron radiation, which
discovered a peculiar feature: all photoelectrons emitted from the droplets upon ionization below
atomic IP have very low energies (less than 1meV). In the present experiments the dynamics of
ionization is studied by exciting droplets by a pulsed VUV radiat ion generated using the highorder
harmonic generation technique. The droplets are subsequently probed by an IR pulse,
which leads to change of photoelectron kinetic energy distributions. The results show
femtosecond and picosecond relaxation dynamics involving localization of initial VUV
excitation in the bulk of the droplet or in the surface region. Bulk excitations tend to quickly
relax to a long-lived excited state, while the surface excitations lead to an autoionization channel
possibly competing with emission of excited atoms and molecules. Dynamics at longer times
(>10 ps) indicate that bulk excitons are likely to emerge on the surface.
References:
[1] D. Peterka et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 043401 (2003)
Hydrogen Bonding, Vibrational, and Rotational Dynamics at Aqueous
Interfaces
Alex Benderskii
University of Southern California
This talk will review recent results on the rotational relaxation time scales and vibrational
couplings at the air/water interface probed by the surface-selective sum frequency generation
(SFG) spectroscopy. Rotational time scales of a small, linear rigid probe molecule (propiolic
acid) were inferred from the SFG spectral line shapes recorded using different (SFG-vis-IR)
polarization combinations. The time scales are found nearly an order of magnitude faster than
expected for similar molecules in bulk water. A combination of heterodyne-detected sum
frequency generation (HD-SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and isotopic dilution studies was used
to probe intra- and intermolecular vibrational couplings of the OD-stretch modes at the air-water
interface of H2O:HOD:D2O mixtures. The 揻ree OD?mode couples effectively only to the
搊ther OD?mode on the same molecule, whose frequency can be extracted from the
measurement. This reports on the average H-bond strength in the top-most layer at the water
surface, which is found to be slightly weaker than the bulk average.
Laboratory Spectroscopy in the Era of Big Science Data Users
John C. Pearson
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Mail Stop
301-429, Pasadena, CA 91109
Historically spectroscopy has been performed by small research groups interested is
experimentally investigating fundamental chemical and physical aspects of nature.
Subsequently, the spectroscopically derived constants of nature have proven to be exquisitely
useful in a variety of applied science investigations including chemical detection, process
control, environmental monitoring, Earth science, planetary science and Astrophysics. Many of
the applications which utilize spectroscopic data have grown into (multi)billion dollar class
enterprises often desiring very specific spectral information to successfully address their
scientific goals. In the mean time spectroscopy has become a mature field, with the fundamental
principles and many aspects of fundamental chemistry and physics having been fully elucidated.
The result is a different landscape for spectroscopy between specific big project driven data
needs and the often difficult fundamental chemical and physical investigations that remain.
Spectroscopists need to understand that big projects actually offer a number of unique and often
surprising opportunities so that humble servitude is rarely even an option. Spectroscopists with
their broad technical background in instrumentation, measurements and fundamental physics and
chemistry should not assume that the engineering specialists developing big projects understand
the nuances of spectroscopic measurements, the full implications or propagation of measurement
errors, or even how to accurately make basic measurements. If spectroscopists are willing to
adapt to the new political and technical reality, they can assure that there will be plenty of
interesting fundamental molecular physics research that must to be done as well as a steady
stream of funding. The path to remaining kings of the new landscape will be discussed.
Solid-like Coherent Vibronic Dynamics in a Room Temperature Liquid:
Resonant Raman and Absorption Spectroscopy of Liquid Bromine
Marie N. van Staveren, Edward T. Branigan, and V. Ara Apkarian
University of California, Irvine
UV-Vis absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of liquid bromine are presented,
and rigorously interpreted. The RR spectrum, which shows an anharmonic vibrational
progression of thirty overtones, defines the ground state potential in the range 2.05 Å < r < 3.06
Å. The excited state A , B, C potentials are extracted from the absorption spectrum. ?The
spectrum is first inverted under the assumption of the classical reflection approximation, then
corrected by forward simulations through quantum time correlations. While the quantum to
classical correction for individual electronic transitions are small (~200 cm-1 in the Franck-
Condon window), corrections for quantum interference between overlapping bands are
significantly larger (on the order of 1000 cm-1 displacements of potentials in the Franck-Condon
window). The extrapolated B and C potentials are used to simulate an RR spectrum.
Remarkably, the RR lineshapes are skewed toward the red, indicating up-chirp in frequencies
that develop over a period of 400 fs. Evidently, the molecular vibrations adiabatically follow the
solvent cage, which is impulsively driven into expansion during the ~20 fs evolution on the
electronically excited state. Despite the strong electronic intermolecular interactions, vibrational
dynamics in liquid bromine retain coherence in ordered, sluggish local cages ? dynamics akin to
molecules isolated in structured cryogenic rare gas solids.
Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Neutrals and Ions by VUV and IR-VUV
Photoionization and Photodissociation Methods
C. Y. Ng
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616, U.S.A.
Webpage: http://www.chem.ucdavis.edu/faculty/cf-info.php?id=35
E-mail address: cyng@chem.ucdavis.edu
Recent developments of single-photon vacumm ultraviolet (VUV) and two-color infrared (IR)-
VUV and VUV-IR photoionization and photoelectron methods for spectroscopy and reaction dynamics
studies will be presented.1-5 The application of the VUV pulsed field ionization (PFI) methods has
allowed the determination of thermochemical data of many small molecules with unprecedented
precision. By preparing molecules in single rovibrational states using a single-mode IR laser (optical
resolution = 0.007 cm-1) prior to VUV photoionphotoelectron measurements, we have demonstrated that
rotationally selected and resolved IRVUV-PFI-photoelectron (PFI-PE) spectra for polyatomic molecules
can be obtained. Using VUV photoionization as a probe and by scanning the IR laser frequency, we have
shown that highresolution IR spectra for many neutral polyatomic species can be measured with high
sensitivity. Two-color VUV-IR photo-induced Rydberg ionization experiment, in which high-n Rydberg
states are prepared by VUV-photoexcitation followed by IR-induced autoionization, has also been found
to be applicable for IR spectroscopic measurement of molecules in excited Rydberg states. High-n
Rydberg tagging time-of-flight measurements for nascent H, O, and S atomic photofragments formed in
laser photodissociation have also been successfully made using singlephoton VUV excitation.4
References:
1. C. Y. Ng, 揤acuum Ultraviolet Spectroscopy and Chemistry Using Photoionization and Photoelectron
Methods? Ann. Rev. Phys. Chem. 53, 101-140 (2002).
2. C. Y. Ng, 揟wo-Color Photoionization and Photoelectron Studies by Combining Infrared and Vacuum
Ultraviolet? J. Electron Spectroscopy & Related Phenomena (invited review), 152, 142-179 (2004).
3. Kai-Chung Lau and Cheuk-Yiu Ng, 揃enchmarking state-of-the-art ab initio thermochemical
predictions with accurate pulsed-field ionization photoion-photoelectron measurements? Accounts of
Chemical Research, 39, 823-829 (2006).
4. B. Jones, J. Zhou, L. Yang, and C. Y. Ng, 揌igh-resolution Rydberg tagging time-of-flight
measurements of atomic photofragments by single-photon vacuum ultraviolet Laser Excitation? Rev. Sci.
Instrum. 79, 123106 (2008).
5. C. Y. Ng, 揝pectroscopy and Dynamics of Neutrals and Ions by high-resolution infrared vacuum
ultraviolet photoionization and photoelectron methods? in 揊rontiers of Molecular Spectroscopy? edited
by Jaan Laane (Elsvier, 2009) Chap. 19, page 659-691.
Measurements of Peroxy Radicals
Using Chemical Amplification-Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy
Yingdi Liu, Rodrigo Morales-Cueto, James Hargrove, David Medina, and Jingsong Zhang*
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside
The peroxy radical chemical amplification (PERCA) method is combined with cavity
ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) to detect peroxy radicals HO2 and RO2. In the PERCA method,
HO2 and RO2 are first converted to NO2 via reactions with NO, and the OH and RO co-products
are then recycled back to HO2 in subsequent reactions with CO and O2; the chain reactions of
HO2 are repeated and amplify the level of NO2. The amplified NO2 is then monitored by CRDS,
a sensitive absorption technique. The PERCA-CRDS method is calibrated using a HO2 radical
source (0.5-3 ppbv), which is generated by thermal decomposition of H2O2 vapor (permeated
from 2% H2O2 solution through a porous Teflon tubing) up to 600 oC. Using a 2-meter long
6.35-mm o.d. Teflon tubing as the flow reactor and 2.5 ppmv NO and 2.5-10% vol/vol CO, the
PERCA amplification factor or chain length, Δ[NO2]/([HO2]+[RO2]), is determined to be 150?0
(90% confidence limit) in this study. The peroxy radical detection sensitivity by PERCA-CRDS
is estimated to be ~10 pptv/60 s. Ambient measurements of the peroxy radicals are carried out at
Riverside, California from March to October in 2007 to demonstrate the PERCA-CRDS
technique.
Triplet State Chemistry of Biologically Relevant Pyridoxal 5?Phosphate
Schiff Base as Determined by Transient Absorption Spectroscopies
Melissa P. Hill, Lucy H. Freer, Elizabeth C. Carroll, Michael D. Toney and Delmar S. Larsen
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis
Excited state dynamics of the pyridoxal 5?phosphate (PLP) Schiff base (SB) blue
absorbing cofactor in solution have been resolved using pump-probe and pump-dumpprobe
transient absorption spectroscopies spanning 18 decades (10-14
?104
s). Femtosecond pumpprobe
studies showed formation of a SB triplet state within picoseconds following 400-nm
excitation; nanosecond pump-probe experiments revealed decay of this triplet state within
microseconds. We show that the triplet state has lower C!-H pKa* compared to ground state pKa,
inducing rapid formation of a quinonoid intermediate that is essential in the thermally-activated
reaction of PLP-dependent enzymes. A photochemical intermediate with absorption consistent
with quinonoid was observed during nanosecond pump-probe experiments. Additional
femtosecond pump-dump-probe experiments showed transiently dumping SB singlet excited
state population reduces SB triplet yield. Repumping SB triplet facilitates intersystem crossing
causing rapid filling of PLP-SB ground state. These data suggest incoherent optical control of an
enzymatic reaction. Because of this, we are able to show dramatic increases in catalytic activity
of the PLP-dependent enzyme aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) and K258A AAT, an inactive
mutant) under exposure to 440-nm light.
Photochemistry, Photophysics, and Structures of Functional Tryptophan
Residues:
Radical Intermediates and Protein Anchors
Judy E. Kim
University of California, San Diego
The aromatic amino acid tryptophan is unique among the 20 natural amino acids; for
example, tryptophan exhibits the largest accessible nonpolar surface area that is highly
polarizable, has the greatest ionization potential, possesses an indole N-H moiety that is capable
of hydrogen bond donation, and displays the greatest electrostatic potential for cation-π
interactions. These important chemical properties render tryptophan an important functional
residue in diverse biological systems. Our group utilizes vibrational and electronic spectroscopy
to probe the specific photophysical, photochemical, and structural properties of tryptophan in
two broad themes in biology: electron transfer chemistry and membrane proteins. We will
primarily focus on the topic of biological electron transfer reactions for the current presentation.
Tryptophan radicals play a significant role in mediating biological electron transfer and
catalytic processes. Here, we report on the photo-induced reduction of the copper(II) center in
azurin from the native tryptophan residue, and present evidence supporting a direct electron
transfer mechanism between the two redox-active species. The electronic, magnetic, and
vibrational spectra of this long-lived neutral tryptophan radical in a hydrophobic pocket are
compared to those of a partially solvent-exposed radical to identify spectral characteristics of
tryptophan radicals that are sensitive to the local environment. The optical absorption spectra
show characteristic double-peak features that can be attributed to two different electronic states,
and the absorption wavelength decreases by 25 nm in a hydrophobic environment. Electron
paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals an anisotropic signal with partially resolved
coupling, and microwave saturation experiments support intramolecular electron transfer. The
resonance Raman frequencies are downshifted by ~10 cm-1 for the hydrophobic radical and
display different relative intensities. The comparison of electronic absorption, electron
paramagnetic resonance, and resonance Raman spectra reveal the hydrophobicity, conformation,
hydrogen bonding, and protonation state of a tryptophan radical within a protein. Additional
studies in wild type azurin reveal a novel photo-induced charge-separation reaction over a
distance of 20 Å that involves the copper center, and native tryptophan and tyrosine residues.
Proposed electron and proton transfer pathways are discussed.
57th Annual Western Spectroscopy Association Conference, February 3-5, 2010 Participants
Matthew Asplund
Brigham Young University
C-309
Provo UT 84606
asplund@chem.byu.edu
FRANK G. BAGLIN
UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA
UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA
RENO NV. 89557
baglin@unr.edu
Sigrid Barklund
Caltech
1200 E California Blvd
Pasadena CA 91125
barklund@caltech.edu
Michael Barrett
Quantel USA Inc.
601 Haggerty Lane
Bozeman MT 59715
mbarrett@quantelusa.edu
M Justine Bell
The University of California Berkeley
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab
Berkeley CA 94720
justine_bell@berkeley.edu
Alexander Benderskii
Univeristy of Southern California
Department of Chemistry
Los Angeles CA 90089
alex.benderskii@usc.edu
Craig Bieler
Albion College
Chemistry Dept.
Albion MI 49224
cbieler@albion.edu
Chrissy L Binkley
Westmont College
955 La Paz Road
Santa Barbara CA 93108
cl.binkley@gmail.com
Teresa J Bixby
UC Berkeley
UC Berkeley
D44 Hildebrand Berkeley CA
Edward T Branigan
University of California
Irvine
Irvine CA 94697
ebraniga@uci.edu
Hana Cho
LBNL
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab
Berkeley CA 94720
chn0823@hanmail.net
Kathryn Colby
University of California
Riverside
Riverside Ca 92507
Cesar S Contreras
NASA Ames Research Center
MS 245-6
Moffett Field CA 94035
cesar.contreras@nasa.gov
Amy Cordones
UC Berkeley
UC Berkeley Dept. of Chemistry
Berkeley CA 94720
acordon@berkeley.edu
Philip L Croteau
University of California, Berkeley
Boering Group
Berkeley CA 94720-1460
philip_croteau@berkeley.edu
Paul H Davis
Boise Technology
5465 E Terra Linda Way
Namap ID 83687
paul.davis@boisetechnology.org
Casey R Davis Van-Atta
Pomona College
Seaver Chemistry Lab
Claremont CA 91711
crd02006@mymail.pomona.edu
Emily E Fenn
Stanford University
380 Roth Way
Stanford CA 94305
eefenn@stanford.edu
57th Annual Western Spectroscopy Association Conference, February 3-5, 2010 Participants
Robert Field
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Chemistry
Cambridge MA 02139
rwfield@mit.edu
Nicole C Freyschlag
Point Loma Nazarene University
3900 Lomaland Dr
San Diego CA 92106
nfreyschlag@pointloma.edu
Kendall S Fruchey
Stanford
1823 Woodland Ave
East Palo Alto CA 94303
kfruchey@stanford.edu
Maria A Garcia
University of Utah
315 South 1400 East
Salt Lake City UT 84121
utaaaah@msn.com
Nien-Hui Ge
University of California, Irvine
Department of Chemistry
Irvine CA 92697-2025
nhge@uci.edu
Zsolt Gengeliczki
Stanford University
Chem Department
Stanford CA 94305
genzso@stanford.edu
Fabien Goulay
Sandia National Lab
Combustion Research Facility
Livermore CA 94551
fgoulay@sandia.gov
Fred J Grieman
Pomona College
Seaver Chemistry Lab
Claremont CA 91711
fjg04747@pomona.edu
Harshal Gupta
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
4800 Oak Grove Dr.
Pasadena CA 91109
harshal.gupta@jpl.nasa.gov
Wendi A Hale
Westmont College
955 La Paz Road
Santa Barbara CA 93108
whale@westmont.edu
Fangyuan Han
Oregon State University
Department of Chemistry
Corvallis OR 97331
hanf@onid.orst.edu
Robert A Harris
UC Berkeley
Dept Chemistry
Berkeley Ca 94720
raharris@berkely.edu
Colin Harthcock
Oregon State University
2200 NW Jackson Ave Appt209
Corvallis OR 97331
harthcoc@onid.orst.edu
Qian He
University of San Francisco
2130 Fulton Street
San Francisco CA 94117
qhe@dons.usfca.edu
Melissa Hill
University of California, Davis
Department of Chemistry
Davis CA 95616
mphill@ucdavis.edu
Haifeng Huang
Sandia National Labs
7011 East Ave
MS 9055 Livermore CA
925-294-4853
Xinchuan Huang
SETI Institute
MS 245-6
Moffet Field CA
Nils Huse
Lawrence Berkeley Lab
1 Cyclotron Rd.
Berkeley CA 94720
nhuse@lbl.gov
57th Annual Western Spectroscopy Association Conference, February 3-5, 2010 Participants
Leonard Jusinski
Sandia National Labs
PO Box 969
Livermore CA 94550
lejusin@sandia.gov
Jeffrey J. Kay
Sandia National Laboratories
7011 East Ave. MS 9055
Livermore CA 94550
jjkay79@gmail.com
Anne M Kelley
University of California, Merced
School of Natural Sciences
Merced CA 95343
Anne Kelley <amkelley@ucmerced.edu>
Peter B. Kelly
University of California, Davis
Davis CA 95616
pbkelly.ucdavis@gmail.com
Isahak Khachatryan
UC Irvine
Irvine CA 92697
isahak_87@yahoo.com
Judy Kim
University of California, San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla CA 92093
judyk@ucsd.edu
Kilyoung Kim
Brigham Young University
Department of Chemistry and
Biochemistry
Provo UT 84602
roadyoung1@gmail.com
Oleg Kornilov
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
UC Berkeley
Berkeley CA 94720
okornilov@berkeley.edu
Olha Krechkivska
University of Utah
Chemistry Department
Salt Lake City UT 84102
Dharmalingam Kurunthu
University of California
Department of Chemistry
Riverside CA
Anh Le
Arizona State University
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Tempe Az 85287
atle2@asu.edu
Alfred Leung
California State University
Long Beach
Long Beach CA 90840-3901
afleung@csulb.edu
Yingdi Liu
UC-riverside
chemistry department
riverside CA 92521
eagle-emperor@hotmail.com
David A Long
Caltech
Division of Chemistry
Pasadena CA 91125
dlong@caltech.edu
Lisa Marshall
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
248 River St
Cambridge MA 02139
lmarshal@mit.edu
Kenneth A Martin
Point Loma Nazarene University
3900 Lomaland Dr
San Diego CA 92106
kmartin@pointloma.edu
David B. McLay
Queen's University
Stirling Hall
Ontario K7L 3N6 Canada
mclayd@queensu.ca
David Medina
UC Riverside
501 W. Big Springs Rd
Riverside CA 92521
dmedi004@student.ucr.edu
57th Annual Western Spectroscopy Association Conference, February 3-5, 2010 Participants
Gerard Meijer
Fritz-Haber-Institut der
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft
Faradayweg 4-6
Berlin Germany
meijer@fhi-berlin.mpg.de
Daniel J Merthe
Sandia National Laboratories
P.O. Box 969 MS 9055
Livermore CA 94451
djmerth@sandia.gov
C. Bradley Moore
U. C. Berkeley
Department of Chemistry
Berkeley CA 94720-1460
moorecb@berkeley.edu
Michael Naffziger
Oregon State University
636 NW 2nd Street
Corvallis OR 97330
naffzigm@onid.orst.edu
Cheuk-Yiu Ng
University of California, Davis
Department of Chemistry
Davis CA 95616
cyng@chem.ucdavis.edu
Allan M Nishimura
Westmont College
955 La Paz Road
Santa Barbara CA 93108
nishimu@westmont.edu
David L Osborn
Sandia National Laboratories
PO BOX 969
Livermore CA 94551-0959
dlosbor@sandia.gov
James E Patterson
Brigham Young University
C303 BNSN
Provo UT 84602
jepatterson@chem.byu.edu
Michael Paul
Oregon State University
213 Weniger Hall
Corvallis OR 97331
paulmi@onid.orst.edu
John Pearson
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Mail Stop 301-429
Pasadena CA 91109
John.C.Pearson@jpl.nasa.gov
Jordan M Pio
University of California-Irvine
Department of Chemistry
Irvine CA 92697
pioj@uci.edu
John B Randazzo
University of California
Berkeley
Berkeley CA 92720
jrandaz2@berkeley.edu
Amelia W. Ray
University of San Francisco
714 Masonic Ave.
San Francisco CA 94117
awray@usfca.edu
Beth Reed
University of Colorado, Boulder
215 UCB
Boulder CO 80309
beth.reed@colorado.edu
Sherman Rutherford
Duniway Stockroom Corp.
1305 Space Park Way
Mountain View CA 94043
sherm.r@duniway.com
Benjamin Schwartz
University of California, Los Angeles
Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry
Los Angeles CA 90095-1569
schwartz@chem.ucla.edu
Gary W. Scott
University of California, Riverside
Department of Chemistry
Riverside CA 92506
gary.scott@ucr.edu
Trevor Sears
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Department of Chemistry, Bldg 555
Upton NY 11974
sears@bnl.gov
57th Annual Western Spectroscopy Association Conference, February 3-5, 2010 Participants
Dan Sluss
Bosie Technology Inc.
5456 E Terra Linda Way
Nampa ID 83687
daniel.sluss@boisetechnology.org
Yu Song
University of California
Riverside
Riverside CA
Marina Stavytska-Barba
UC Merced
5200 N Lake Rd
Merced CA 95343
mstavytska-barba@ucmerced.edu
Timothy C Steimle
Arizona State University
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Tempe AZ 85250
TSteimle@asu.edu
Adam Sturlaugson
Stanford University
380 Roth Way
Stanford CA 94305
alsturl@stanford.edu
Ming Sun
The University of Arizona
933 N Cherry AVE
Tucson AZ 85721
msun@email.arizona.edu
Craig A Taatjes
Sandia National Laboratories
Combustion Research Facility. MS9055
Livermore CA 94551
cataatj@sandia.gov
Darcy H Tarrant
University of California
Riverside
University of California Riverside Riverside
(510) 540-3869
Molly A Taylor
University of California
Irvine
Irvine CA
Marie van Staveren
University of California
Irvine
Irvine CA 92697
mvanstav@uci.edu
Esa Vehmanen
UC Irvine
Natural Science II
Irvine CA 92697
esvehman@jyu.fi
Elisabeth A Wade
Mills College
5000 MacArthur Blvd.
Oakland CA 94613
ewade@mills.edu
Fang Wang
Arizona State University
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Tempe Az 85287
Fang.Wang@asu.edu
Kira C Watson
Pomona College
Seaver Chemistry Lab
Claremont CA 91711
kcw02006@mymail.pomona.edu
W. Atom Yee
Santa Clara University
College of Arts and Sciences
Santa Clara CA 95053
ayee@scu.edu
Ryan M Young
University of California, Berkeley
College of Chemistry
Berkeley CA 94720
rmyoung@berkeley.edu
Shanshan Yu
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
4800 Oak Grove Drive
Pasadena CA 91109
shanshan.yu@jpl.nasa.gov
Lindsay Zack
University of Arizona
Dept of Chemistry
Tucson AZ 85721
lnz@email.arizona.edu
57th Annual Western Spectroscopy Association Conference, February 3-5, 2010 Participants
Martin Zanni
Univerisity of Wisconsin, Madison
Department of Chemistry
Madison WI 53706
zanni@chem.wisc.edu
Jie Zhang
Oregon State University
Department of Chemistry
Corvallis OR 97331
zhangji@onid.orst.edu
Xiujuan Zhuang
Arizona State University
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Tempe AZ 85250
xzhuang2@asu.edu
Lucy Ziurys
University of Arizona
Steward Observatory - ARO
Tuscon AZ 85721-0065
lziurys@email.arizona.edu
Western Spectroscopy Association - Sponsors 1/18/10 3:37 PM
http://www.westernspectroscopy.org/sponsors.html Page 1 of 2
SPONSORS
The Western Spectroscopy Association gratefully acknowledges financial
support from our sponsors
Spectra-Physics
3635 Peterson Way
Santa Clara, CA 95054
Phone: 800-775-5273
Fax: 408-980-6921
sales@spectra-physics.com
www.spectra-physics.com
Patrick McNamara
Phone: 866-532-1064
3150 Central Expressway
Santa Clara, CA 95051
p.mcnamara@continuumlasers.com
www.continuumlasers.com
Stephen P. Smith, Ph.D.
Director North American Sales
Quantel USA
Bozeman, MT
(406) 586-0131
(406) 586-2924 FAX
spsmith@quantelusa.com
www.quantel-laser.com
Lighthouse Photonics
520 E Weddell Drive
Sunnyvale, CA 94089
Toll-free: 1-888-356-7933
Direct: 408-752-0740
info@lighthousephotonics.com
www.lighthousephotonics.com
Western Spectroscopy Association - Sponsors 1/18/10 3:37 PM
http://www.westernspectroscopy.org/sponsors.html Page 2 of 2
Duniway Stockroom Corp.
1305 Space Park Way
Mountain View, CA 94043
Toll Free: 800-446-8811
Direct: 650-969-8811
FAX: 650-965-0764
info@duniway.com
www.duniway.com
Coherent, Inc.
5100 Patrick Henry Drive
Santa Clara, CA 95054
800-527-3786
tech.sales@Coherent.com
http://www.coherent.com
Combustion Research Facility
Sandia National Laboratories
PO Box 969
Livermore CA, 94551-0969
http://www.ca.sandia.gov/CRF/
Leslie M. Tack, Ph.D.
President
Pembroke Instruments, LLC
1001 Bayhill Drive
Second Floor-Suite 200
San Bruno, California 94066 USA
Office: 650-616-4202
Mobile: 415-860-4217
Fax: 415-585-0652
Les.Tack@PembrokeInstruments.com
Pembroke Instruments, LLC
Journal of Physical Chemistry
http://pubs.acs.org/journals/jpchax/

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